AmorArmor
A visual anthropological exploration of worldwide traditional clothing and jewellery.
AmorArmor
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FOLKWEAR SOCIETY is now live! Discover unique salvaged original folkwear and their anthropological stories at: www.folkwearsociety.com
Folkwear Society is a global platform that reignites the curiosity of exploring into the visual and material folk cultures by salvaging and preserving original folk clothing and by embedding these full of life artefacts into their own forgotten history, as well as into our contemporary story. Folkwear Society is a celebration of local traditions, of cultural artefacts that age beautifully, of the creativity and artistic taste expressed by such creations — but it is equally a call to record and generate the anthropologic content around these salvaged items.
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Folkwear Society is now live. Discover unique salvaged original folkwear and their anthropological stories at: www.folkwearsociety.com
Folkwear Society is a global platform that reignites the curiosity of exploring into the visual and material folk cultures by salvaging and preserving original folk clothing and by embedding these full of life artefacts into their own forgotten history, as well as into our contemporary story. Folkwear Society is a celebration of local traditions, of cultural artefacts that age beautifully, of the creativity and artistic taste expressed by such creations — but it is equally a call to record and generate the anthropologic content around these salvaged items.
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FOLKWEAR SOCIETY is now LIVE! Discover unique salvaged original folkwear and their anthropological stories at: www.folkwearsociety.com
Folkwear Society is a global platform that reignites the curiosity of exploring into the visual and material folk cultures by salvaging and preserving original folk clothing and by embedding these full of life artefacts into their own forgotten history, as well as into our contemporary story. Folkwear Society is a celebration of local traditions, of cultural artefacts that age beautifully, of the creativity and artistic taste expressed by such creations — but it is equally a call to record and generate the anthropologic content around these salvaged items.
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Do you know what this is?
“Borangic” – raw silk, introduced at the end of the 19th century, became the most desirable fabric in the hand weaving of “marame”, the headwear of choice of peasant women in the southern and eastern ethnographic areas of Romania.
COMING SOON, an anthropological exploration of the visual and material folk heritage of Romania.
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A Caldarari (“Kelderar”, “Kalderar”, “Kotlyars”) family in Romania, 1930s, photo from Florin Petru Manole’s archive.
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Romanian peasant woman from Clopotiva, Hunedoara county, 1923. Photography by ethnographer Romulus Vuia
 
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Well, hello there.
Romanian peasants from Bistrita-Nasaud county, Transylvania. cca. 1930s
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Pride in Romanian women from Chisătău, Banat, 1923.
Photography by anthropologist Romulus Vuia.
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Pride in Romanian woman in Poiana, Caraș-Severin, 1923.
Photographed by anthropologist Romulus Vuia.
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Credit: Jason Taylor/Survival International  
The Dongria Kondh women of the Niyamgiri hills in Odisha state, India – who call themselves Jharnia, or protectors of streams – have lived in the lush, forested hills for millennia. For the past 10 years these women have worked with Dongria men to protect their most sacred mountain, Niyam Dongar, against plans for an opencast bauxite …
More on http://www.theguardian.com/global-development/gallery/2013/mar/07/international-womens-day-tribal-heroines-pictures